Research Cinematographer – Philip Bloom

Philip Bloom might not be widely known as a big name in in the world of film but he has been a great inspiration from me as I learn how to create films with a cinematic style using modern low budget cameras such as the Sony A7 and Panasonic GH3/4

Philip Bloom is a filmmaker and blogger, he became well known for his blogs and instructional videos centered around filmmaking using DSLR cameras as opposed to conventional high end film cameras.

Based in London Bloom has worked on a number of high profile productions, most notably the 2011 documentary ‘How to start a revolution’. He is most well known for his blogs and seminars that help users set up their cameras in the best possible way to capture images.

Pictures   Photos from How to Start a Revolution  2011    IMDb

Blooms inspiration to me really is his ability to create stunning cinematic images from everyday places while demonstrating the functions and benefits of cameras and lenses. Work that stands out for me is his demonstration of the Digital Bolex D-16 camera where he created a short film around London’s city hall area. I think these shots demonstrate how to use cinematic shots to create a sense of place.

 

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Research Photography – Peter Fraser

While sitting in a lecture for sound image and sensory experience we were presented with a number of images by Peter Fraser. These images were used to describe ‘Fine Art’ which is a concept of culture that has really always been confusing for me. Some of the images I could find some sort of meaning with but when presented with the image TWO BLUE BUCKETS., this image seemed to me the final straw in my understanding of fine art and I let out a giggle and didn’t understand how I could take this image seriously. why was it so special? What is the meaning (if any?)

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I Was intrigued to find out more about this image and the photographer so decided to take his book, also entitled ‘TWO BLUE BUCKETS’ out of the library. Having looked through the images and studied the accompanying text it became clear that the special element wasn’t just the image but how it was produced, how it worked alongside a series of images and how it broke conventions at the time it was produced.

At the time (1983) most photographers were using black and white. Walker Evans said that “Colour photography is vulgar” Fraser explored the use of colour to highlight the present verses the past and used it to add an extra element to an image. seeing both ‘The blue and the sky’ Rupert Martin Two Blue Buckets.

In this interview Fraser explains of his work with icons as being there fro that moment in time and I think this alongside the curating of the book has helped me to understand how actual process of presenting an image in printed form in great detail is just as much a part of the image as is the subject matter and when creating an image thinking about how its intended look (in this case with colour) can have an impact on the composition.

I’ve decided to use my SISE still image project to try and dip into these concepts and create my own Peter Fraser inspired images.

 

Photographer – Christina Matos – Albers

Been looking around to try and understand more about abstract photography for my SISE project. Finding it very hard to scrub away from taking traditional ‘good’ photographs. Looking at a site called Lens Culture I stumbled across an image that just caught my eye. 

Estudio de Luz, No. 1769. © Cristina Matos-Albers

I was intrigued at how this image was made (using reflective and coloured gels) and discovered that Christina Matos – Albers has a lot of location photography that will be helpful when researching my ideas to create my own sense of place images.

Research Sound Sculpter – Bill Fontana

Bill Fontana, initially a composer but I think his recent work ties in with the work we have been concentrating on in our SISE project in terms of creating a sense of place. Fontana became interested in exploring how every day acoustics of the world can become musical. He has recorded a number of sound portraits around the world. Fontana presented the installation ‘Vertical Water’ in New Yorks Whitney museum in 1991, this sculpture involved the use of sound taken from Niagara falls played through speakers placed in the concrete facade of the museum Different frequencies were played from different speakers placed around the wall. The sound of the falls created an effect that masked out the general sound of the street.

“ Fontana’s sound environments renew our awareness of the places we inhabit and the
powerful role sound plays in both our sense of self and memory. Fontana’s work is
predicated on a sophisticated investigation into how we perceive sounds in the world.
He has created a series of compelling projects that subtly treat the interplay between the
origins of sounds and the contexts in which we perceive them, causing the viewer to
become conscious of himself and his senses as he hears and perceives anew the world he
inhabits”
John Hanhardt, Guggenheim Museum

This is the most inspirational soundscape for me so far by Bill Fontana of San Franciscos Golden Gate Bridge.  I was thinking of using bridges in my project an I think it would be really interesting to create something like this and relate it to images of the bridge.

The images put the audience at the location and we can relate to the sounds but without them (and with them to a point) the sounds are very unnerving especially the sound of the fog horn which also reminds me of the communication between the spaceship and scientists in Steven Spielberg’s ‘Close Encounters’ movie from  1977