New Chartist Idea First Tutorial – Jen Stein

Over the past week myself and Hannah-Jane have had a complete U-Turn on out idea proposal. Initially we planned to work with the National Museum of Wales in their St Fagan’s welsh history museum but we had complications with access and story so it was a very slow process. While working with the Museum we had the opportunity for some work experience with them filming the annual Newport Chartism commemorative march, doing this inspired me to change the idea for our project and this is the one we will pitch to the industry.

Jen Stein

This was our first meeting with Jennifer. Jen is an Assistant Research Professor of Media Arts + Practice at the University of Southern California and is over in the UK for a year carrying out research with UWE and the pervasive media studio. This tutorial was really useful because Jen was unaware of our previous idea so she had no opinion of it which meant we could pitch our new idea in a totally fresh way. This pitch also gave us the chance to explain the background to the idea to somebody who is unfamiliar with the content and the area that our project would take place in.

Jens tutorial was a chance for us to get more enthusiastic about the Chartism project, she gave us some practical advice on accessibility, having the project online for armchair viewing and how we could overcome security issues with equipment such as having people pay a deposit/leave a driving licence or be accompanied around by adults or members of the team. We planned on using a screen to display the Klynt page and Jen advised us about the cost of the touch screen but also that using a normal screen with a mouse might not work as many people still may not know how to use it.

As we are planning on making a real world element and an online element Jen advised that they shouldn’t be identical. We want users who experience the real world story to be able to find different things in the online version so that they are not just seeing what they just experienced. this could be as simple as having items talked about in the real world experience on display in the online element but with more information. Essentially we need to make both experiences worth doing by the same group of people.

With regard to the app we discussed the importance of making people look around, we don’t just want to spoon feed them the information, we want them to be actively involved in the story and this can be as simple as directing them to look for something.

Jen recommended checking out street artist Candy Chang for inspiration with our interactive elements. We were particularly interested in the ‘I Wish I Was‘ project that invited people to place stickers around the local area in New Orleans after hurricane Katrina. This idea fits into our pans to ask the public to suggest a new peoples charter.

Candy Chang 'I Wish I Was'

Candy Chang ‘I Wish I Was’

Jen has given us some great inspiration and highlighted some of the practical problems we will face. a Very useful first tutorial.

 

 

 

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Research – Social Services – “Mum locks Kids in Room”

Interactive Media Research Material

I first heard about this story while traveling to Uni listening to BBC Radio 4 and thought it was related to the work we are doing for our Interactive Media module where our story centers on (fictional) failings of the social services departments in the UK.

Mirror

Click here to view the story in full on the Mirrors website.

This news story centres on the probable failings of a number of council bodies including social services who are allowing two Thirteen year old girls to be locked in their bedroom at night with a baby monitor as a way of communication between themselves and their mother in the event that they need to leave the room or are in danger from their ‘peodophile’ step father.

This story raises some serious questions about how government bodies seem to not act in a reasonable and responsible way but instead rely on a number of ‘tick box’ solutions to close a case.

This story is interesting in developing the story we are creating in which we see our characters (2 young children) separated from their father and imprisoned by a person who has been elected to protect them. I think it offers an interesting insight into how some of the decisions are made in cases like these and we could use this information to further develop our narrative and ensure realism in the story.